Can Vitamin D Help You Live Longer?

by on November 8th, 2011 at 7:00 am

Vitamin D is often casually referred to as the “sunshine vitamin” since it is normally produced by the body after exposure to direct sunlight. However, many experts say that we’re not getting enough, and should supplement our intake via vitamin D-rich foods and supplements.

In addition, many studies suggest that vitamin D can not only help improve quality of life, but possibly even cut the risk of life-threatening conditions.

 

What are the benefits of vitamin D?

  • Promotes bone and muscle strength. Vitamin D is most known commonly known for aiding the body’s absorption of calcium1, which the body needs to maintain strong bones, a key element to preventing osteoporosis. Studies have suggested that calcium and vitamin D supplementation could enhance skeletal muscle strength in volunteers who had a vitamin D deficiency.2
  • Cuts risk of diabetes. According to a recent study in Diabetes Care, sufficient levels of vitamin D may even lower your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, possibly due its anti-inflammatory properties. Diabetes is often cited as an underlying cause of death, typically tied to many heart-related complications, including stroke and heart disease, according to the American Diabetes association.
  • Boosts immunity. Another study found that vitamin D has also been shown to regulate the immune system.3
  • Alleviates asthma. According to the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vitamin D deficiency increased asthma symptoms.

Good sources of vitamin D

  • Salmon
  • Canned tuna
  • Eggs (with yolk)
  • Yogurt fortified with vitamin D
  • Fat-free milk fortified with vitamin D

 

NR Essentials™ Vitamin D3 Supports bone and muscle strength


1Jane Higdon. “Vitamin B12.” Linus Pauling Institute. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminB12/. Accessed September 23, 2011

2Gupta R. et al. “Effect of Cholecalciferol and Calcium Supplementation on Muscle Strength and Energy Metabolism in Vitamin D-deficient Asian Indians: a Randomized, Controlled Trial.” Clinical Endocrinology. 2010; 73(4): 445-51. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20455886. Accessed September 26, 2011. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2010.03816.x.

3Di Rosa M. et al. “Vitamin D3: A Helpful Immuno-Modulator.” Immunology. 2011; 134(2): 123-39. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21896008. Accessed September 26, 2011. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2567.2011.03482.x.

 

 

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